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OCHA refers to and disseminates key guidelines of the IASC, such as the IASC GBV Guidelines and IASC Gender handbook.  

OCHA also systematically integrates prevention and response to sexual and gender-based View More

OCHA refers to and disseminates key guidelines of the IASC, such as the IASC GBV Guidelines and IASC Gender handbook.  

OCHA also systematically integrates prevention and response to sexual and gender-based violence (SGBV) for consideration in intergovernmental policy processes and inclusion in the normative framework for humanitarian action.  In close consultation with the IASC, OCHA drafts the annual reports of the Secretary-General on Strengthening of the coordination of emergency humanitarian assistance of the United Nations, and on International cooperation on humanitarian assistance in the field of natural disasters, from relief to development, which contain policy discussions and recommendations on strengthening the gender and GBV aspects of humanitarian action. Importantly, in close collaboration with the IASC, OCHA also advocates for the report topics and recommendations in the intergovernmental fora, including at the ECOSOC Humanitarian Affairs Segment, as well as in the Protection of Civilians discussion in the Security Council, including in OCHA’s briefings on behalf of the humanitarian community to the Security Council’s informal Expert Group on the Protection of Civilians in Armed Conflict. OCHA briefed the PoC Expert Group eight times in 2017, covering the situations in Afghanistan, the Central African Republic, the Democratic Republic of Congo, Iraq, Mali, Somalia, South Sudan and Sudan (Darfur), on conflict-related and broader sexual violence concerns such as rape, sexual slavery, trafficking of women and girls, sexual exploitation and abuse, and broader violence against women.
 
OCHA also facilitates an online platform - Platform for Action, Commitments and Transformations - www.agendaforhumanity.org, and tracks the implementation of WHS commitments and initiatives through an online reporting system. 

 

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Gender analysis is at the core of OCHA’s central strategic planning and field-focused operational planning. The IASC Gender Marker, introduced in 2010, also guides OCHA-managed funding and financing. OCHA’s Country View More

Gender analysis is at the core of OCHA’s central strategic planning and field-focused operational planning. The IASC Gender Marker, introduced in 2010, also guides OCHA-managed funding and financing. OCHA’s Country Offices has also played a key role in further mainstreaming gender in the Humanitarian Needs Overviews (HNOs) and Humanitarian Response Plans (HRPs).  In 2017, in 25% of HRPs gender analysis fully defined how HRP implementation took into account distinct needs/risks related to gender, and in 70% of HRPs gender analysis partially informed implementation.  

In 2017, out of the 397 projects funded by CERF, 280 (71%) had a Gender Marker 2a indicating strong gender mainstreaming. A total of 77 (19%) had a 2b indicating a targeted gender action and 22 projects (6%) had a Gender Marker 1, meaning limited gender consideration. Eighteen (18 or 4%) were marked “Non- Applicable” as they dealt with the provision of common services to humanitarian partners (air operations, logistics, emergency telecommunications, safety and security), and none (0) were marked 0 which means that all CERF-funded projects for 2017 considered gender to an extent or another in their design. Gender Based Violence was the focus action of 27 projects (7%) of all the 397 projects funded by CERF in 2017, 234 projects (59%) had a GBV component, and 135 projects (34%) had no GBV related activity or component one (1) project was not marked for GBV.

All OCHA managed Country Based-Pooled Funds (CPBFs) apply the Gender Marker in all project proposals. In 2017, 79% of CPBFs projects were designed to contribute significantly to gender equality (76% in 2016), equivalent to $511 million. CBPFs provide the largest source of direct funding for local NGOs, including women’s organizations

 In OCHA’s core digital assets – unocha.org, reliefweb.int and HDX – particular attention was given to highlighting how humanitarian crises impact women and children. For example, on ReliefWeb 1,835 documents were posted in 2017 on Gender-Based Violence and 1,288 Women, Peace and Security documents. 

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OCHA systematically advocates for the inclusion of gender and GBV in intergovernmental policy processes and in the normative frameworks for humanitarian action constituted by the humanitarian resolutions of the General Assembly and View More

OCHA systematically advocates for the inclusion of gender and GBV in intergovernmental policy processes and in the normative frameworks for humanitarian action constituted by the humanitarian resolutions of the General Assembly and ECOSOC. 

OCHA refers to and disseminates key guidelines of the IASC, such as the IASC GBV Guidelines. OCHA also participates in coordination mechanisms such as the GBV Area of Responsibility, and in global policy processes such as the global Call to Action on Protection from GBV in Emergencies and the Real Time Accountability Partnership. 

OCHA formulates a time-bound Gender Policy Instruction every four years to strengthen the response to humanitarian crisis pivoted on a gender analysis and a framework that takes cognizance of the different needs, priorities, capacities, and voices of women and men of all ages and backgrounds. To guide gender equality programming, a Policy Instruction (2016-2020) was endorsed in June 2016, and OCHA has continued its implementation throughout 2017/18. This policy instruction constitutes a significant shift from a gender sensitive approach to a gender responsive approach that leverages the areas where OCHA has a comparative advantage and is pivoted on three key pillars: Accountability, Leadership and Investments in gender equality programming.

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2. OCHA participate in the Inter-Agency Network on Women and Gender Equality: Task Force on Violence against Women. 
3. OCHA is an active member of the United Nations Actions against Sexual Violence in Conflict network. 
5. View More

2. OCHA participate in the Inter-Agency Network on Women and Gender Equality: Task Force on Violence against Women. 
3. OCHA is an active member of the United Nations Actions against Sexual Violence in Conflict network. 
5. OCHA actively supports the roll-out of the IASC Gender Handbook in Humanitarian Action, and supports the development and roll-out of inter-agency tools, such as the IASC Gender Handbook. OCHA initiated and continues to guide the IASC Gender Standby Capacity Project (GenCap). 
6. OCHA actively supports the IASC processes related to PSEA. OCHA participates in the network of IASC Senior Focal Points on PSEA and is also part of the IASC Task Team on Accountability to Affected Populations and Protection from Sexual Exploitation and Abuse. 

 

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OCHA is the task manager of the inter-agency Protection from Sexual Exploitation and Abuse (PSEA) review, agreed in July 2009 at the meeting of the IASC Working Group. The objective of the review is to assess whether the UN and NGOs have implemented View More

OCHA is the task manager of the inter-agency Protection from Sexual Exploitation and Abuse (PSEA) review, agreed in July 2009 at the meeting of the IASC Working Group. The objective of the review is to assess whether the UN and NGOs have implemented policies to address sexual exploitation and abuse by their personnel. Thirteen of 14 agencies agreed to participate in the agency headquarters assessment. Field missions will be organized to DRC and Nepal, while seven other countries will be profiled through alternative methodologies.

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Gender equality programming is a corporate learning priority for the OCHA Learning and Knowledge Management Board. A learning resources catalogue was produced with information on gender equality training (e-courses, onsite training, View More

Gender equality programming is a corporate learning priority for the OCHA Learning and Knowledge Management Board. A learning resources catalogue was produced with information on gender equality training (e-courses, onsite training, communities of practice) including a focus on Gender Based Violence (GBV). 

Monthly Gender Community of Practice sessions are held for OCHA Gender Focal Points and three in-person trainings have been conducted on gender equality programming in humanitarian action. In total, 60 Gender Focal Points in OCHA have participated at the trainings. CERF has also funded training of hundreds of field staff and service providers on GBV. 

At the leadership level and management level, OCHA initiates discussion on gender, GBV and PSEA at Heads of Office Meetings and Annual Retreats.  Humanitarian Coordinators (HCs) have an important role to ensure that gender equality programming is therefore central to humanitarian responses. 100% of the ERC-HC compacts incorporate gender, GBV and PSEA deliverables. HCs must provide field level strategic leadership and guidance to Humanitarian Country Teams and inter cluster/sector working groups to translate these important global level commitments, which are also well articulated in the Secretary-General’s Agenda for Humanity, into concrete collective results and deliverables leading to elevated protection of women and girls from GBV.
In 2017, OCHA developed its ‘People Strategy’, which was launched in January 2018. The strategy encompasses specific long-term strategies and approaches to support the achievement of gender parity, such as leadership development and talent pools.

  In line with the Secretary-General’s Bulletin “special measures for protection from sexual exploitation and sexual abuse” (ST/SGB/2003/13), OCHA has established clear structures and procedures for ensuring compliance with the zero-tolerance policy. Standard operating procedures are in place for submission and receipt of complaints, reporting, investigation and survivor assistance. PSEA focal points have been established in OCHA offices at headquarters, regional and country levels, and all staff members receive training and information on preventing and responding to acts of sexual exploitation and abuse.

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OCHA fully supports the implementation of the crisis component the Minimum Initial Services for Reproductive Health (MISP). Among other activities, CERF funds the deployment of GBV experts, the procurement and distribution of dignity kits, the View More

OCHA fully supports the implementation of the crisis component the Minimum Initial Services for Reproductive Health (MISP). Among other activities, CERF funds the deployment of GBV experts, the procurement and distribution of dignity kits, the procurement of the Inter-Agency Reproductive Kits including the kits #3 and #9 dedicated to the Prevention of Sexual Violence and the Assistance to Survivors of GBV, the establishment of Women’s Safe Places, the training on GBV of field staff and service providers, the awareness activities on GBV, and the community-based interventions to prevent GBV.

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OCHA staff is sensitized on the prevention of gender-based violence, and all partners and staff are informed about applicable codes of conduct. The Office implements confidential complaints mechanisms on gender-based violence, including sexual View More

OCHA staff is sensitized on the prevention of gender-based violence, and all partners and staff are informed about applicable codes of conduct. The Office implements confidential complaints mechanisms on gender-based violence, including sexual violence against women and is responsible for managing the sexual exploitation and abuse focal point network.

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One of OCHA’s 7 priority commitments on gender is to promote gender-responsive Humanitarian Programme Cycle processes. It ensures the systematic inclusion of SGBV programming through the mandatory use of the Gender Marker in View More

One of OCHA’s 7 priority commitments on gender is to promote gender-responsive Humanitarian Programme Cycle processes. It ensures the systematic inclusion of SGBV programming through the mandatory use of the Gender Marker in funded initiatives, and in reports on how gender and SGBV were addressed during project implementation. As an example, the CERF project application and reporting templates require sex- and age disaggregated data. The application template also includes the IASC Gender Marker which is then recorded in the CERF’s Grant Management System Database for tracking and analysis purpose. 

In addition, information and knowledge on gender equality and the empowerment of women and girls have been disseminated through OCHA’s various advocacy platforms such as the corporate website, social media accounts, content websites (such as Medium, Exposure and YouTube) and email. OCHA has updated and edited two “OCHA on Message” products on Gender in Humanitarian Action and Sexual and Gender-based Violence. “OCHA on Message” are reference products that enables staff to communicate OCHA’s position on key issues. OCHA has also delivered remarks and statements containing messaging on gender and SGBV for the Commission on the Status of Women, the 2017 Global Humanitarian Policy Forum, the Center for Global Development and the Royal Institute of International Affairs and as well as briefings to the Security Council, among others.. For International Women’s Day, OCHA launched a successful social media campaign with its “Messengers of Humanity” community around their “Female Humanitarian Heroes” highlighting the professional achievements of women working in humanitarian affairs.

In August, OCHA’s annual World Humanitarian Day campaign centered around the hashtag #NotATarget and advocated for the protection of civilians in armed conflict. The campaign included a strong focus on sexual violence in conflicts, and what can be done to empower and support survivors. As part of a unique collaboration with Facebook, OCHA launched a brand-new Live filter, allowing users to step into the shoes of people affected by conflict as they read real stories from civilians trapped in conflict. The filter included a series of stories by women and girls to highlight the unique challenges they experience in crisis. As part of the campaign, SCB collaborated with UNFPA on a blogpost “Dispelling five myths about sexual violence in emergencies” which was published on OCHA’s Medium platform.

OCHA also supports the International Day to end violence against women and the 16 Days of Activism against gender-based violence. In 2017, OCHA launched a digital campaign, which included an updated Facebook Live filter from World Humanitarian Day that exclusively featured stories of survival from women and girls affected by conflict. The Emergency Relief Coordinator and Deputy Emergency Relief Coordinator, as well as staff members from OCHA’s field offices, participated in the campaign by recording videos, where they shared  the real stories of women trapped in conflict.

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As the secretariat for the Humanitarian Coordinator at field level, OCHA ensures attention to gender-based violence and facilitates the implementation of appropriate solutions. When appropriate, OCHA acts as co-chair of the coordinating agencies in View More

As the secretariat for the Humanitarian Coordinator at field level, OCHA ensures attention to gender-based violence and facilitates the implementation of appropriate solutions. When appropriate, OCHA acts as co-chair of the coordinating agencies in regard to prevention of and response to gender-based violence.

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