About 22 Results

Gender equality programming is a corporate learning priority for the OCHA Learning and Knowledge Management Board. A learning resources catalogue was produced with information on gender equality training (e-courses, onsite training, View More

Gender equality programming is a corporate learning priority for the OCHA Learning and Knowledge Management Board. A learning resources catalogue was produced with information on gender equality training (e-courses, onsite training, communities of practice) including a focus on Gender Based Violence (GBV). 

Monthly Gender Community of Practice sessions are held for OCHA Gender Focal Points and three in-person trainings have been conducted on gender equality programming in humanitarian action. In total, 60 Gender Focal Points in OCHA have participated at the trainings. CERF has also funded training of hundreds of field staff and service providers on GBV. 

At the leadership level and management level, OCHA initiates discussion on gender, GBV and PSEA at Heads of Office Meetings and Annual Retreats.  Humanitarian Coordinators (HCs) have an important role to ensure that gender equality programming is therefore central to humanitarian responses. 100% of the ERC-HC compacts incorporate gender, GBV and PSEA deliverables. HCs must provide field level strategic leadership and guidance to Humanitarian Country Teams and inter cluster/sector working groups to translate these important global level commitments, which are also well articulated in the Secretary-General’s Agenda for Humanity, into concrete collective results and deliverables leading to elevated protection of women and girls from GBV.
In 2017, OCHA developed its ‘People Strategy’, which was launched in January 2018. The strategy encompasses specific long-term strategies and approaches to support the achievement of gender parity, such as leadership development and talent pools.

  In line with the Secretary-General’s Bulletin “special measures for protection from sexual exploitation and sexual abuse” (ST/SGB/2003/13), OCHA has established clear structures and procedures for ensuring compliance with the zero-tolerance policy. Standard operating procedures are in place for submission and receipt of complaints, reporting, investigation and survivor assistance. PSEA focal points have been established in OCHA offices at headquarters, regional and country levels, and all staff members receive training and information on preventing and responding to acts of sexual exploitation and abuse.

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OCHA staff is sensitized on the prevention of gender-based violence, and all partners and staff are informed about applicable codes of conduct. The Office implements confidential complaints mechanisms on gender-based violence, including sexual View More

OCHA staff is sensitized on the prevention of gender-based violence, and all partners and staff are informed about applicable codes of conduct. The Office implements confidential complaints mechanisms on gender-based violence, including sexual violence against women and is responsible for managing the sexual exploitation and abuse focal point network.

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OCHA fully supports the implementation of the crisis component the Minimum Initial Services for Reproductive Health (MISP). Among other activities, CERF funds the deployment of GBV experts, the procurement and distribution of dignity kits, the View More

OCHA fully supports the implementation of the crisis component the Minimum Initial Services for Reproductive Health (MISP). Among other activities, CERF funds the deployment of GBV experts, the procurement and distribution of dignity kits, the procurement of the Inter-Agency Reproductive Kits including the kits #3 and #9 dedicated to the Prevention of Sexual Violence and the Assistance to Survivors of GBV, the establishment of Women’s Safe Places, the training on GBV of field staff and service providers, the awareness activities on GBV, and the community-based interventions to prevent GBV.

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The project “Strengthening prevention of sexual violence in conflict with parties to armed conflict (phase I)” was submitted for funding to UN Action against Sexual Violence in Conflict in December 2009. The project, in which UNICEF, UNFPA, DPA and View More

The project “Strengthening prevention of sexual violence in conflict with parties to armed conflict (phase I)” was submitted for funding to UN Action against Sexual Violence in Conflict in December 2009. The project, in which UNICEF, UNFPA, DPA and OCHA have partnered up, aims to develop a set of tools and approaches for engaging parties to conflict, and calling on them to respect international law and to stop using rape and other forms of sexual violence as a weapon of warfare.

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On behalf of the IASC Sub-working group on Gender, in November 2009 OCHA facilitated a workshop in Panama on gender equality and gender-based violence programming in humanitarian settings for the Central American region. The workshop aimed to roll View More

On behalf of the IASC Sub-working group on Gender, in November 2009 OCHA facilitated a workshop in Panama on gender equality and gender-based violence programming in humanitarian settings for the Central American region. The workshop aimed to roll out the Gender Handbook in Humanitarian Action and the Guidelines for gender-based violence interventions in humanitarian settings.

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OCHA’s Integrated Regional Information Network (IRIN) has produced a number of publications and videos on violence against women in war, and on female genital mutilation. OCHA contributes to awareness-raising and outreach by informing communities View More

OCHA’s Integrated Regional Information Network (IRIN) has produced a number of publications and videos on violence against women in war, and on female genital mutilation. OCHA contributes to awareness-raising and outreach by informing communities about the availability and value of support services for victims of gender-based violence, including sexual violence. It disseminates information on international humanitarian law to arms bearers.

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OCHA supports the Gender Standby Capacity Project (GenCap), in collaboration with the Inter‐Agency Standing Committee (IASC) and the Norwegian Refugee Council (NRC), aimed at building the capacity of humanitarian actors at country level to mainstream View More

OCHA supports the Gender Standby Capacity Project (GenCap), in collaboration with the Inter‐Agency Standing Committee (IASC) and the Norwegian Refugee Council (NRC), aimed at building the capacity of humanitarian actors at country level to mainstream gender in all sectors of humanitarian response. From June 2007 to April 2011, 54 GenCap Advisers have supported 30 Humanitarian Country Teams. A Gender-Based Violence (GBV) window has been established in the GenCap Roster. In August 2011, the Global Public Policy Institute (GPPI) embarked on an evaluation which was commissioned to inform the decision over whether the GenCap Project should be phased out, maintained or expanded, in addition to providing concrete suggestions for change. In mid‐September the evaluators interviewed a broad spectrum of stakeholders in Geneva. Field visits included South Sudan, Sudan, Pakistan and Zimbabwe. Two learning workshops were conducted to verify findings and refine recommendations. The evaluation found that GenCap advisers have made an effective contribution to raising awareness and increasing the understanding and acceptance of gender among humanitarian actors. It concluded that the GenCap project remains highly relevant and should be continued in the medium‐term future.

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A 2011 study “Sex and Age Matter” produced by the Feinstein International Center and sponsored by OCHA and CARE International demonstrates that the humanitarian community needs to greatly increase its collection and use of sex and age disaggregated View More

A 2011 study “Sex and Age Matter” produced by the Feinstein International Center and sponsored by OCHA and CARE International demonstrates that the humanitarian community needs to greatly increase its collection and use of sex and age disaggregated data (SADD) to better inform programming. Researchers thoroughly reviewed numerous published reports from academia, the UN, non-governmental organizations on the effects of natural disasters and armed conflict on civilian populations, with a focus on publications that used SADD, gender and generational analyses to document and analyze those effects. The report can be found at: http://www.unocha.org/what‐wedo/ policy/thematic‐areas/gender‐equality.

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UNICEF and OCHA completed phase 1 of a joint project to prevent use of sexual violence by armed groups. In October 2011, UNODA New York provided expertise to a meeting of the International Action Network on Small Arms (IANSA) on ‘Why Women? Effective View More

UNICEF and OCHA completed phase 1 of a joint project to prevent use of sexual violence by armed groups. In October 2011, UNODA New York provided expertise to a meeting of the International Action Network on Small Arms (IANSA) on ‘Why Women? Effective Engagement for Small Arms Control’ that launched a report on why it is important to include women in small arms control and disarmament initiatives.

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OCHA is the co-chair of the Executive Committees on Humanitarian Affairs and Peace and Security (ECHC/ECPS) UN and NGO Taskforce on protection from sexual exploitation and abuse. It led the development of field-guidance for the implementation of a View More

OCHA is the co-chair of the Executive Committees on Humanitarian Affairs and Peace and Security (ECHC/ECPS) UN and NGO Taskforce on protection from sexual exploitation and abuse. It led the development of field-guidance for the implementation of a victim’s assistance programme in accordance with GA resolution 62/214. Since 2008, 25 OCHA advisors have been deployed through GenCap to 18 humanitarian emergencies.

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