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In June 2010, the International Labour Conference will hold the first round of discussions on a draft instrument on decent work for domestic workers, and in 2011 will discuss the standard(s) with a view to its adoption. A new standard on decent work View More

In June 2010, the International Labour Conference will hold the first round of discussions on a draft instrument on decent work for domestic workers, and in 2011 will discuss the standard(s) with a view to its adoption. A new standard on decent work for domestic workers will contribute to the effective abolition of child labour within domestic work and help to prevent and eliminate violence against domestic workers of any age.

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In July 2010, UNODC hosted an Expert Group Meeting to review draft material for the forthcoming International Framework for Action to Implement the Smuggling of Migrants Protocol, a technical assistance tool to support States in the implementation of View More

In July 2010, UNODC hosted an Expert Group Meeting to review draft material for the forthcoming International Framework for Action to Implement the Smuggling of Migrants Protocol, a technical assistance tool to support States in the implementation of the Smuggling of Migrants Protocol. The draft tool recommends that the special vulnerability of smuggled migrant women to violence be borne in mind in the design, implementation and review of any measures put in place to protect women against violence. The draft provides that addressing violence against women in the context of migrant smuggling begins with addressing the underlying discriminatory norms and behaviour which manifest as increased vulnerability of women to violence, both before being smuggled, during the smuggling process and afterwards, especially when they are living as irregular migrants in or are in the custody of the destination state and/or are returned to their state of origin. At its 17th session (April 2008), the Commission on Crime Prevention and Criminal Justice requested UNODC to convene an intergovernmental group of experts to review and update, as appropriate, the Model Strategies and Practical Measures on the Elimination of Violence against Women in the Field of Crime Prevention and Criminal Justice (hereinafter MSPMs), adopted by the General Assembly in its resolution 52/86.The need to revise the MSPMs stemmed from the recognition that new practices, new thinking and new research have been developed since the adoption of the Model Strategies in December 1997. In July 2010, upon recommendation of the Commission on Crime Prevention and Criminal Justice at its 19th session (May 2010), the Economic and Social Council adopted resolution 2010/15 entitled “Strengthening crime prevention and criminal justice responses to violence against women” for further consideration and possible adoption by the General Assembly at its 65th session. By endorsing this resolution, the Council adopted the guidelines contained in the updated MSPMs (see annex of resolution 2010/15) which represent a comprehensive framework to assist States in developing policies and carrying out actions to eliminate violence against women and to promote equality between men and women within the criminal justice system. They are organized around eleven themes: i) guiding principles; ii) criminal law; iii) criminal procedure; iv) police, prosecutors and other criminal justice officials; v) sentencing and corrections; vi) victim support and assistance; vii) health and social services; viii) training; ix)) research and evaluation; x) crime prevention measures; and xi) international cooperation. The Council urged Member States to evaluate and review their legislation and legal principles, procedures, policies, programmes and practices relating to crime prevention and criminal justice matters, in a manner consistent with their legal systems and drawing upon the updated MSPMs, to determine if they are adequate to prevent and eliminate violence against women. Member States were also called upon to advance effective crime prevention and criminal justice strategies that address violence against women, including strategies aimed at preventing revictimization. The Economic and Social Council, upon recommendation of the Commission on Crime Prevention and Criminal Justice, adopted resolution 2010/16 entitled “UN Rules for Treatment of Women Prisoners and Non-custodial Measures for Women Offenders (the Bangkok Rules)”. The Bangkok Rules, annexed to the resolution, which were developed to supplement the United Nations Standard Minimum Rules for the Treatment of Prisoners and the United Nations Standard Minimum Rules for Non-Custodial Measures (Tokyo Rules) are made up of 70 rules. The Bangkok Rules will be submitted to the General Assembly, at its 65th session, for its consideration and possible approval.

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DAW, now part of UN Women, now part of UN Women, prepared reports of the Secretary General to the sixty-fifth session of the General Assembly on intensification of efforts to eliminate all forms of violence against women (A/65/208), and View More

DAW, now part of UN Women, now part of UN Women, prepared reports of the Secretary General to the sixty-fifth session of the General Assembly on intensification of efforts to eliminate all forms of violence against women (A/65/208), and trafficking in women and girls (A/65/209). On 11 March 2010, the Commission on the Status of Women held an interactive panel discussion on the theme “Unite to End Violence against Women”. A Moderator’s summary of the panel is available on the DAW website at: https://www.un.org/womenwatch/daw/beijing15/ievents.html.

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Members of UNHCR’s Executive Committee prepared a draft Conclusion on the rights and protection needs of refugees with disabilities, which included the need to prevent and respond to violence against women refugees with disabilities.

Members of UNHCR’s Executive Committee prepared a draft Conclusion on the rights and protection needs of refugees with disabilities, which included the need to prevent and respond to violence against women refugees with disabilities.

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UNIFEM, now part of UN Women, supported data collection toward the development of effective public policies in Guinea Bissau and Moldova, and supported women’s networks in Ecuador to monitor commitments to end violence against women through surveys.

UNIFEM, now part of UN Women, supported data collection toward the development of effective public policies in Guinea Bissau and Moldova, and supported women’s networks in Ecuador to monitor commitments to end violence against women through surveys.

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The World Bank’s first global study of urban violence, “Violence in the City” (2010), included analysis of gender based violence (GBV) in urban neighborhoods of Port-au-Prince, Haiti; Dili, Timor-Leste; Nairobi, Kenya; Johannesburg, South Africa; and View More

The World Bank’s first global study of urban violence, “Violence in the City” (2010), included analysis of gender based violence (GBV) in urban neighborhoods of Port-au-Prince, Haiti; Dili, Timor-Leste; Nairobi, Kenya; Johannesburg, South Africa; and Fortaleza, Brazil. The study reported lifetime sexual violence victimization ranging from 08.% to over 20% in some neighborhoods, with over half of all incidents occurring in public spaces.

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Global burden of disease: WHO and the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine are continuing work on new global and regional estimates for the prevalence of intimate partner violence, non-partner sexual violence, child sexual abuse, and the View More

Global burden of disease: WHO and the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine are continuing work on new global and regional estimates for the prevalence of intimate partner violence, non-partner sexual violence, child sexual abuse, and the health risks and consequences associated with these types of violence.

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UNHCR will expand the use of the Gender-Based Violence Information Management System (GBVIMS) to improve safe data collection, analysis and information, in coordination with International Rescue Committee and UNFPA. The countries where the system View More

UNHCR will expand the use of the Gender-Based Violence Information Management System (GBVIMS) to improve safe data collection, analysis and information, in coordination with International Rescue Committee and UNFPA. The countries where the system will be introduced are: Yemen, DRC, Liberia and Colombia. The system is already in place in a number of countries, including Kenya, Uganda and Sudan.

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At the global level, UNDP is working with the Social Science Research Council and other research institutions around the world to establish the Global Center for Research on Gender and Crisis Prevention and Recovery (G-CPR). This initiative will View More

At the global level, UNDP is working with the Social Science Research Council and other research institutions around the world to establish the Global Center for Research on Gender and Crisis Prevention and Recovery (G-CPR). This initiative will strengthen research and capacity in the field of gender and security, including through the provision of grants to southern research institutions, with a view to informing policy and programming.

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The ECLAC Gender Observatory of Gender Equality of Latin America and the Carribean recollected and analysed national legislation on violence against women.

The ECLAC Gender Observatory of Gender Equality of Latin America and the Carribean recollected and analysed national legislation on violence against women.

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