About 6 Results
  • Mar. 2012 - Feb. 2013
  • |
  • UNICEF
In 2012, UNICEF commissioned the production of a handbook on Birth Registration for use by UNICEF staff; produced a technical guidance note on age assessment procedures in English, French and Spanish; assisted 38 countries (21 from sub-Saharan View More

In 2012, UNICEF commissioned the production of a handbook on Birth Registration for use by UNICEF staff; produced a technical guidance note on age assessment procedures in English, French and Spanish; assisted 38 countries (21 from sub-Saharan Africa) to complete a mapping of their child protection systems; developed together with an NGO working group on children without parental care, ‘Moving Forward: Implementing the ‘Guidelines for the Alternative Care of Children’, an implementation handbook; and made available the child-friendly and staff-friendly versions of the Guidelines for the Alternative Care of Children in French and Russian to complement the existing English, Spanish and Portuguese versions.

Hide

In Latin America, OHCHR and UN Women, together with the Spanish Federation of Human Rights Organizations and the Carlos IIII University of Madrid supported the formulation of a regional Protocol for the investigation of Femicide. The protocol will View More

In Latin America, OHCHR and UN Women, together with the Spanish Federation of Human Rights Organizations and the Carlos IIII University of Madrid supported the formulation of a regional Protocol for the investigation of Femicide. The protocol will assist in strengthening national capacities to investigate, prosecute, punish and redress femicide. The Protocol will be promoted through, inter alia, regional and international human rights mechanisms. In Kosovo, OHCHR supported the development of a national action plan on Security Council resolution 1325.

Hide

  • Mar. 2012 - Feb. 2013
  • |
  • UNAIDS
In Guatemala, UNAIDS, with the government and civil society, jointly developed the National Action Framework with a focus on gender-based violence, which has been further incorporated into the operational plan of Guatemala’s National HIV Strategy.

In Guatemala, UNAIDS, with the government and civil society, jointly developed the National Action Framework with a focus on gender-based violence, which has been further incorporated into the operational plan of Guatemala’s National HIV Strategy.

Hide

  • Mar. 2012 - Feb. 2013
  • |
  • UNDP
UNDP is supporting the development of national plans, including: Sectorial Regional Gender Actions Plans in line with the National Gender Strategy (2012-2020) in Kyrgyzstan; a new National Action Plan on Violence against Women, accounting for the View More

UNDP is supporting the development of national plans, including: Sectorial Regional Gender Actions Plans in line with the National Gender Strategy (2012-2020) in Kyrgyzstan; a new National Action Plan on Violence against Women, accounting for the recommendations from the Feasibility Study for One Stop Service Center (OSSC) for Survivors of Violence against Women together with the GBV sub-committee of the gender technical working group in Cambodia; and a a Five Year Plan (FY 2012-2016) against Gender Based Violence in Nepal being implemented with the support of gender desks that have been established in all districts to handle the issues of gender based violence.

Hide

Under the “UNAIDS Action for Results: Outcomes Framework “ (2009-2011), UNFPA, UNDP, UN WOMEN, WHO, UNICEF, UNHCR and the MenEngage Alliance (Sonke Gender Justice and the Athena Network), also in close collaboration with the Interagency Working Group View More

Under the “UNAIDS Action for Results: Outcomes Framework “ (2009-2011), UNFPA, UNDP, UN WOMEN, WHO, UNICEF, UNHCR and the MenEngage Alliance (Sonke Gender Justice and the Athena Network), also in close collaboration with the Interagency Working Group on Women, Girls, Gender Equality and HIV – supported countries to address the linkages between GBV and HIV/AIDS in National Strategic Plans; building effective partnerships to achieve this; and strengthening capacity to engage men and boys for promoting and addressing gender equality.

Hide

UN Women supported new local or national action plans to end violence against women in Cambodia, the Dominican Republic, FYR Macedonia (second generation strategy 2012-2015), Indonesia, Timor Leste (together with UNDP, UNFPA, IOM and UNICEF), and the View More

UN Women supported new local or national action plans to end violence against women in Cambodia, the Dominican Republic, FYR Macedonia (second generation strategy 2012-2015), Indonesia, Timor Leste (together with UNDP, UNFPA, IOM and UNICEF), and the Maldives (through a multi-sectoral group convened by the SG Campaign). In addition, the Family Protection Authority was established in the Maldives to oversee the implementation of the new action plan. In Nepal, UN Women provided technical expertise and support to engender the Foreign Employment Policy including protection and promotion of human rights for women migrant workers at country of origin, transit country or destination country to avoid harassment and discrimination. UN Women is also working to support the inclusion of voices of the most excluded groups such as youth, indigenous, ethnic minorities, rural women and others in public policy formulation in relation to ending violence against women. For example, in Ecuador, the entity responsible for the restructuring of the System of Justice Administration has included the priorities of the indigenous women’s organization’s agenda in its formal restructuring process. In Bolivia, indigenous women have now secured agreements for their involvement in Rights and Justice oversight committees at municipal levels. Work with women from indigenous Guaraní and Ayoreao communities in the Brazil-Paraguay border focused on empowering young women and girls to register and report cases of rights violations, including trafficking. In Mexico, UN Women has supported the development of a care model for violence against women that also provide sexual and reproductive health service, implemented through Indigenous Women’s Houses (CAMIs). In 2012, the number of CAMIs increased to 19, operating in 12 states – with government funding and indigenous women responsible for administering the centres. The CAMIs have been acknowledged as a best practice in the Permanent Forum for Indigenous Peoples.

Hide